White Nationalism, the Core of the Alt Right

 

Whether we are talking about Neo-Nazis, the KKK, White Supremacists, or whatever, we can simply call them White Nationalists.

Modern White Nationalism came from a series of ethnic movements which began following WWII. We can argue that the KKK existed well before that, which functioned as both a white identity politics faction and a white supremacist group, but most of the justifications for ethnic nationhood that people fall back on today came about after the war. That war created the argument that the Jewish people needed a homeland to call their own which could advocate for them with the international community and provide a place of refuge to escape the historical pogroms and holocaust that dotted their history. I agree with that, by the way, but others used the same idea to make ethnic nationalist movements of their own.

Following this, other ethnic groups began to advocate for broader nationalism, such as the Arabs with the creation of Ba’athism, with its goal of creating an Arab superstate. So the trend wasn’t universally a problem with white ethnicities. Feeling a loss of power and status from emancipation and the removal of Jim Crow laws, whites rose up in various reactionary hate groups. Some advocate what they believe to be a “White Genocide” taking the arguments of globalism to much greater extremes, and expounding on the concept of white identity to the point of advocating the creation of a White State to protect the “White Race(s)” from extinction.

I said it before, but given what I’ve just written, it needs to be said again. These are not my views, but the views as best I can communicate them of the groups I’m trying to describe specifically for the purposes of isolating this group in the future.

While I’ve tried to describe these groups dispassionately because I think some of them have valid motives that can be reasoned with, I simply have to distance myself from this one as explicitly dangerous and harmful to the future of civilization. I’ve got nothing redeeming to say about these people. Their actions and rhetoric speak for itself.

What I can say is that it seems most of the Alt Right don’t approve of them either. Dubbed by many as the 1488ers, for various reasons, the White Nationalists say the same hateful things as the trolls, but literally mean it. It needs to be said that they are looked down upon as the people giving the Alt Right a bad name. Let that sink in.

The big problem is that the person perhaps most responsible for kicking off the Alt Right, at least popularizing it, is from this group — Richard Spencer. Spencer coined the term when he created a website, AltRight(dot)com to link together the various factions of the Alt Right and is also a well known White Nationalist. You can see more about that in The History of the Alt Right.

What I can say that makes me feel very good about the universe is that this faction accounts for very little of the population, but a great deal of the attention given by the media — leading all of us to be more concerned that the whole of this mysterious Alt Right, are in fact White Nationalists .

To give an idea of the numbers I am talking about, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the KKK only has around 7,000 members. That’s it, just 7,000. It’s a similar situation with other White Nationalist factions. Furthermore, most are broken up into various feuding factions, negating their influence as a movement. A proof of their influence, or relative lack thereof, is in looking at their leader, Richard Spencer explaining nearly two years ago what he believed the Alt Right was. The virtue signalling throughout seems endemic of the sort of pseudo-fascist ideals we see now apparent in the Alt-Right. Remember, he was the one got the ball rolling on the Alt Right. His video however, to this day, only has 27,000 views. Given how much influence the mainstream media gives him, it’s almost impossible for me to imagine such a low following. I could name other leading political commentators who could command more views by showing themselves eating a sandwich. For example, a video uploaded by the Conservative speaker and writer Ben Shapiro on his channel the Daily Wire about Charlottesville gained more than twice as many views in a single day. Even I have had far more views on many of my answers. The fact that he can’t get more of a real following than that, should tell us about the realistic potency of this group.

The reason I feel that this group is so important has to do to changes going on within the Alt Right and moves by this faction, which I consider “the core”. The core lost control of the Alt Right following the attempts to promote it to others and broaden it’s appeal. Milo Yiannopoulos has stated that people in the Alt Right knew about the racists, but dismissed them as some 200 crazy hillbillies from Kentucky that nobody cared about, that their numbers maybe accounted for 2–5%, but he then stated that due to media obsession with this group in particular, the decent parts of the Alt Right have fled, leaving only this group.

I think there is some truth to this. I do believe that the Alt Right was so good in rebranding themselves that it did bring on such a wave of new voices that the original White Nationalist faction was drown out by the various other groups I’ve mentioned above. I believe in this second wave came the voices such as Milo and the news outlet Breitbart, who latched on to their messages of Free Speech, Civic Nationalism, and advocacy for groups usually targeted by Progressives to promote themselves. In that way, I believe it’s possible that people like Milo and Breitbart got into bed with something they didn’t fully understand, though it is also entirely possible they simply believed that regardless of the Alt Right’s history, it had evolved away from it’s racist past.

What seems to be the case now, however is that people are leaving the Alt Right in large numbers, leaving behind the core group, which is actively working to radicalize the rest to their ideology. They are coming back together to form what many are calling The New Right.

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